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Belfast Metropolitan Area Plan 2015
District Proposals: Doagh Urban Environment

Area of Village Character

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The following Area of Village Character (AVC) is designated in Doagh as identified on Map No. 8a – Doagh and on clarification Map No. 8b – Doagh Area of Village Character.
Policy for the control of development within the AVC is contained in Policy UE 3 in Part 3, Volume 1 of the Plan.
Designation DH 05 Area of Village Character Doagh
An Area of Village Character is designated in Doagh as identified on Map No. 8a - Doagh and on clarification Map No. 8b – Doagh Area of Village Character.
Key features of the area which will be taken into account when assessing development proposals are as follows:-
  • The ruins of the medieval St Mary’s Church (circa 1250);
  • The circular mound of a Norman motte and adjacent graveyard, on the east bank of the Doagh River;
  • The eighteenth century Marquis of Donegall deer and game park (listed);
  • The 1805 Fisherwick lodge (listed), including ‘Fisherwick Terrace’ (circa 1890) and the nearby "Torrens Hall"(1885), a fine civic building;
  • The nineteenth century two storey hotel and stabling block, which remains (though altered) at no.10 Main Street, constructed by the Marquis of Donegall in 1815;
  • The 1858 Rowan Memorial in the village centre, complemented by original Victorian shop and domestic frontages;
  • The 1844 Methodist Church and associated buildings;
  • The late Victorian Oriel House;
  • The terrace of three small, brick dwellings located at the junction of Burn Road and Main Street; and
  • The two inter-war terraces of dwellings (Nos. 1-37 Main Street), to the north of the Norman Motte.
All proposals will be assessed against key design criteria 4A, 5B as contained in Policy UE 3 in Part 3, Volume 1 of the Plan (See Newtownabbey District Proposals Appendix 2).
Human settlement at this crossing and meeting point at the Doagh River has been recorded for more than seven hundred years. Early remains include the ruins of the medieval St Mary’s Church (circa 1250) that may have been part of an earlier sixth century monastic site and the circular mound of a Norman mote. In the eighteenth century, the Marquis of Donegall laid out his large deer and game park (listed) and around 1805 built Fisherwick lodge (listed) as a hunting lodge.
The distinctive form of the road layout divides the village into three main areas: Fisherwick Lodge/Mill Road to the north; the village centre between the junction of Main Street, Ballymena Road and Ballyclare Roads; and to the south, the land which terminates at the medieval church and motte.
The north approach to the village along Mill Road is characterised by an undulating road beside the trees and rubble stone boundary wall to Fisherwick Lodge (listed). Doagh is a historically important village and its notable character lies in delicate balance with the increasing pressure from heavy through traffic. Careful management is required to safeguard its identity.
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