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Belfast Metropolitan Area Plan 2015
District Proposals: Metropolitan Newtownabbey Urban Environment (Page 2 of 2)

Designation MNY 34 Area of Townscape Character Old Manse Road
An Area of Townscape Character is designated at Old Manse Road as identified on Map No. 2a - Metropolitan Newtownabbey and on clarification Map No. 2g –Old Manse Road Area of Townscape Character.
Key features of the area which will be taken into account when assessing development proposals are as follows:-
  • Six late nineteenth century Victorian detached dwellings and one pair of Victorian semi-detached houses, located in a mature landscape setting on generous and well-established plots;
  • The simple, conservative and symmetrical rendered blocks at Nos. 49/51 Old Manse Road and No. 46 Circular Road;
  • The highly decorative, Gothic inspired "Fernville", a listed dwelling at No. 57 Old Manse Road; and
  • The well maintained brick dwellings at No.55 Old Manse Road and ‘Carragh Lodge’, which comprise features influenced by the Arts and Crafts Movement.
All proposals will be assessed against key design criteria 2A, 2B, 2C, 3A, as contained in Policy UE 3 in Part 3, Volume 1 of the Plan (See Newtownabbey District Proposals Appendix 2).

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This is a small, distinct area of late nineteenth century houses lying to the north-west of the former Whiteabbey village. The area has become subsumed by inter-war and post-war housing developments despite the area originating in a rural setting on higher ground. The area grew with the expansion of the late Victorian and Edwardian suburbs beyond the city boundaries, in conjunction with the development of the railways and the issue of ‘villa’ or ‘house-free’ tickets by the Belfast and Northern Counties Railway Company.
The area has a significant Victorian presence and its heritage and townscape qualities should be safeguarded.
Designation MNY 35 Area of Townscape Character Rush Park
An Area of Townscape Character is designated at Rush Park as identified on Map No.2a - Metropolitan Newtownabbey and on clarification Map No. 2h – Rush Park Area of Townscape Character.
Key features of the area which will be taken into account when assessing development proposals are as follows:-
  • The high quality and generously landscaped open space, which is integrated with the form and layout of post war housing, comprising two tower blocks and two storey terraced housing; and
  • The hedging along the Doagh Road and Shore Road and mature parkland setting of the enclosed post war housing.
All proposals will be assessed against key design criteria 4A, 4B, 4C, 5A, 5C, 5D as contained in Policy UE 3 in Part 3, Volume 1 of the Plan (See Newtownabbey District Proposals Appendix 2).
Rushpark estate was designed and built by the Northern Ireland Housing Trust during the 1950s and is a good example of post-war social housing combining buildings and landscaped open spaces.
The generous provision of open space within the layout allows for comfortable accommodation within the two tower blocks and surrounding two storey terraced houses.
The leafy maturity of the parkland setting now extends to the houses and gardens. Any development in the area should be carefully controlled if its distinctive character and appearance are to be safeguarded.
Designation MNY 36 Area of Townscape Character Whiteabbey
An Area of Townscape Character is designated in Whiteabbey as identified on Map No. 2a - Metropolitan Newtownabbey and on clarification Map No. 2i – Whiteabbey Area of Townscape Character.
Key features of the area which will be taken into account when assessing development proposals are as follows:-
  • The several older properties, located along the narrow, winding, former main street, with stone boundary walls and large well-stocked gardens;
  • The late Victorian terraces including Nos. 683-691, 639-653 and 617-625 Shore Road;
  • The detached property located at No.1 Circular Road, set within generous grounds;
  • No. 655 Shore Road, an 1880’s Domestic Revival detached brick dwelling with a fine, decorative timber porch and tall, heavily sculptured brick chimney stacks; and
  • The large neo-classical church (circa 1840).
All proposals will be assessed against key design criteria 3A, 3B, 5A as contained in Policy UE 3 in Part 3, Volume 1 of the Plan (See Newtownabbey District Proposals Appendix 2).
Located eleven kilometres north of Belfast, on the northern shore of Belfast Lough, Whiteabbey developed during the early part of the nineteenth century to service the cotton and bleaching works.
The railway stations built at Whiteabbey and Jordanstown in the 1860s encouraged commuter traffic and the growth of suburbs. In the 1970s Whiteabbey was bypassed by the new Shore Road, isolating it from large volumes of daily traffic but encouraging further development.
The hilly topography of the area, provides some of the variety which characterises Whiteabbey, including the steep slopes of Old Manse Road and Circular Road.
Whiteabbey has retained its historic urban fabric in the form of the original street pattern and buildings.
Designation MNY 37 Area of Townscape Character Whiteabbey Mill
An Area of Townscape Character is designated at Whiteabbey Mill as identified on Map No.2a - Metropolitan Newtownabbey and on clarification Map No. 2j – Whiteabbey Mill Area of Townscape Character.
Key features of the area which will be taken into account when assessing development proposals are as follows:-
  • ‘Clock Corner’ and the late Victorian properties at Nos. 494-536 Shore Road, which formed the impressive entrance;
  • The rendered terraced housing facing onto Glenville Road;
  • Whiteabbey Congregational Church (1886), located along Glenville Road;
  • The individually designed dwellings located along Dillons Avenue (started 1890s), with late Victorian and Arts and Crafts features, mature gardens and tall hedging;
  • The trees lining Dillons Avenue, the original driveway to Fernagh House, along with the gatelodge at No. 484 Shore Road;
  • No. 8 Dillons Avenue, an early to mid seventeenth century property;
  • The 1920s dwellings on large plots, located along Dillons Avenue;
  • "Burnbrae" at No.3 Dillons Avenue, with distinctive features including eyebrow moulds on corbels, decorative keystones and a turreted corner bay window; and
  • Uniformity of scale, design of external elements (such as chimney stacks, pitched roofs, gables and front doors), materials, proportions of openings with vertical emphasis, decoration and detailing displayed in the terraces and detached housing. Private gardens and excellent views across Belfast Lough are also important elements of this housing.
All proposals will be assessed against key design criteria 2A, 2B, 2C, 3A, 3B, 3C, 4A, 4B, 5A as contained in Policy UE 3 in Part 3, Volume 1 of the Plan (See Newtownabbey District Proposals Appendix 2).
The former Whiteabbey bleaching works and mill originated in the early nineteenth century, centred on the millpond on Glenville Road. The mills were the focal point in the social and economic life of the local community during the nineteenth century. Although nothing now remains of the Whiteabbey mills, the terraced housing, previously occupied by the employees, has survived together with the larger dwellings in Dillons Avenue.
Designation MNY 38 Area of Townscape Character Ypres Park
An Area of Townscape Character is designated at Ypres Park as identified on Map No. 2a - Metropolitan Newtownabbey and on clarification Map No. 2k – Ypres Park Area of Townscape Character.
Key features of the area which will be taken into account when assessing development proposals are as follows:-
  • The short terraces of four dwellings and semi-detached housing, in a lineal north/south layout, which contain stylistic patterns of fenestration, hipped Westmoreland slated roofs with lead ridges, tall chimney stacks, overhanging eaves, harled wall finishes, raking buttresses and flat concrete canopies over the main entrance;
  • The open space, around the terraces and semi-detached housing; and
  • The widening road and semi-circular grassed space, overlooked by the surrounding properties, which provides a central focus.
All proposals will be assessed against key design criteria 3B, 4A, 4B as contained in Policy UE 3 in Part 3, Volume 1 of the Plan (See Newtownabbey District Proposals Appendix 2).
Built in 1926, Ypres Park was developed for veterans of the Great War by the Irish Sailors and Soldiers Land Trust. By comparison with other contemporary houses built for rent, “Trust” houses were constructed to a very high standard both internally and externally. Each house had an allotment as well as a reasonably sized rear garden. Ypres Park remains largely intact and in good condition exhibiting the original form, open spaces and details.
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